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Thread: SF3 Truss Rod

  1. #1
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    SF3 Truss Rod

    I'm trying to understand the procedure for adjusting the truss rod on a SF3 (AG03011548) to increase relief. I loosened the nut (counterclockwise) that's threaded on a rod. Under the nut is a washer. I expected to see a change, but after a day the relief is still something less than .007. Should the rod turn with the nut? The nut turns freely by hand on the rod when I loosen it, and of course, it tightens when I turn clockwise.

    Perhaps my light gauge strings (9s) are too light? There is some buzzing, but that could be my lousy playing style.

    Should loosing the 1/4 nut (counterclockwise) on a SF3 increase relief? Are nut+rod one piece (and mine is broken)?

    Thanks,
    Dennis

  2. #2
    Senior Member SFIV1967's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Are nut+rod one piece?
    No.
    Sometimes when the truss rod was not touched for ages you can loosen the nut and bow the neck by hand a little bit upwards to get the truss rod loose.

    Here's a good general description: https://www.taylorguitars.com/suppor...od-adjustments

    Ralf
    Last edited by SFIV1967; 03-12-2019 at 02:21 PM.

  3. #3
    If the truss rod on a SF3 is a single action truss as found on Guild acoustics, turning the nut CCW should loosen the nut, and allow the neck to bow forward under string tension. Tightening the nut (CW) will counteract the string tension and straighten the neck.

    However, if you can freely turn the nut by hand (the rod should NOT turn with the nut), it sounds as if the nut is completely loose already. Turning it further CCW would not have any effect on the neck geometry. You could test to see if the rod still functions by tightening it til you feel it snug against the washer, then try turning it 1/4-1/2 turn , and see if it decreases the neck relief (I know this isn't what you are trying to do... just testing the rod function at this point). If it is really loose, you might have to make a couple adjustments before you see any effect...

    From what I recall, 0.007" is at the low end of spec for a Guild acoustic (don't know about electrics)... short of more extreme measures to adjust the neck, going to a heavier gauge string may allow you a little more latitude in the relief adjustment.
    Dave

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  4. #4
    Senior Member adorshki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GardMan View Post
    If the truss rod on a SF3 is a single action truss as found on Guild acoustics, turning the nut CCW should loosen the nut, and allow the neck to bow forward under string tension. Tightening the nut (CW) will counteract the string tension and straighten the neck.

    However, if you can freely turn the nut by hand (the rod should NOT turn with the nut), it sounds as if the nut is completely loose already. Turning it further CCW would not have any effect on the neck geometry. You could test to see if the rod still functions by tightening it til you feel it snug against the washer, then try turning it 1/4-1/2 turn , and see if it decreases the neck relief (I know this isn't what you are trying to do... just testing the rod function at this point). If it is really loose, you might have to make a couple adjustments before you see any effect...

    From what I recall, 0.007" is at the low end of spec for a Guild acoustic (don't know about electrics)... short of more extreme measures to adjust the neck, going to a heavier gauge string may allow you a little more latitude in the relief adjustment.
    Purely for corroboration yes to all of the above, but I think you might have posted in this forum by accident (although I can understand seeing the SF as an acoustic electric).
    Not that we mind, but suspect you'll get more info/suggestions for fixes by posting this question in the Archtop/Hollowbody and/or "Tech Shop" forums where more "pure electric" members are likely to see it.
    A moderator could move it for you, send a PM to Chaz or Fronobulax or Default.
    Good luck!
    Al
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Guildedagain's Avatar
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    In my notes, relief on electrics should be .025mm, on acoustics .05mm, per Stew Mac which seems to be in love with mm...

    I should find the specs in thousands, I find them a lot less confusing.

    If the neck refuses to bow without any tension on the truss rod, then the strings aren't heavy enough (need to increase tension) or, as with this '79 Strat Hardtail I had for years that somebody had refretted with Jumbo frets, the big fret tangs made it impossible for the neck to bow, I [literally] "couldn't get no relief" without going to BIG strings like SRV's...

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Default's Avatar
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    It's a single action trussrod, so yours isn't broken, but I'm preetty confident that it wasn't set up for 9's. I would leave the trussrod loose an put a set of 11's on it. That ought to put some relief in it. Then you can throw the slinkies on it and adjust the neck to your liking.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Guildedagain View Post
    In my notes, relief on electrics should be .025mm, on acoustics .05mm, per Stew Mac which seems to be in love with mm...

    Howdy

    .025mm is roughly 1/1000 inch - if that is not low enough, then I'm out . . .



    DENNIS - if you try tightening the trussrod - please sit on a chair - put the guitar standing on the floor between your legs - bend the neck back while supporting guitar body with your legs/feet - this will prevent stripping of threads.

    And while you mention relief - have you checked the straightness of the neck ? Sighting ? Ruler? Etc ?
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  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the suggestions. I checked relief with a feeler gauge and also used a straight edge. Relief is something smaller then my .007 feeler gauge.

    I've backed the nut out and tried wiggling the rod with the nut driver. I also tried prying up on the washer after backing the nut out enough to allow a flat blade screwdriver under the nut. I applied forward pressure with my hand, but it's not moving. I may try tightening it and see if it moves in that direction. Perhaps the neck will never move with these light gauge strings? Next string change, I will move to a bigger gauge and see what happens.
    Dennis

    Dennis

  9. #9
    I have to ask, when you're measuring relief are you fretting the 1st and a high fret, or is this normal unfretted string space above the frets, 'cause if it's the latter there more than the truss rod that needs to be worked on.
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  10. #10
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    I put a capo on the first fret, hold down the 15th fret and measure at the 7th. I also checked with a purpose-built straight-edge. A .007 feeler gauge placed between the 7th fret and string causes the string to rise, so it's less than .007. However, it doesn't seem to be a big problem. I was curious if adjusting it to the Gibson's recommended .12 or .10 would make a difference.

    The nut is loose, not doing anything, and the relief hasn't changed. Perhaps the rod is jammed internally? Next string change, I will replace with a heavier gauge, (flat wound if the nut accepts them?) and see what happens.
    Dennis
    Last edited by Dennis; 03-13-2019 at 07:25 PM.

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